Although Hip-Hop has progressed past the sensationalism of Trap Music during the 2010s, the last decade saw the Hip-Hop subgenre get more popular than ever thanks to a wave of artists like Future and Migos. Throughout the widespread appreciation for trap, some of Hip-Hop’s OGs often debated about the origins of the subgenre, with Gucci Mane, Jeezy, and T.I. being some of the names most commonly cited in arguments as the rappers who created trap.

In recent years, T.I. has made a point to steer clear of claiming that he is the founder of trap, but he has continued to hammer in the point that he is responsible for coining the phrase “trap music.” For that argument, he often points to his sophomore album and his first release on his now-legendary label Grand Hustle: 2003’s Trap Muzik.

T.I. during Kenny Burns and Little X's Birthday Party at NA in New York City, New York, United States.
Johnny Nunez/WireImage/Getty Images

While sonically, Trap Muzik sounds quite different than you’d expect an album named after one of the most gritty, unpolished, and raw Hip-Hop subgenres to sound like, it’s definitely an important album in Hip-Hop history, and today, it celebrates its 18-year anniversary. Word has it that Pharrell has previously called T.I the “Jay-Z of the South,” and the King of the South definitely approaches Trap Muzik with that kind of energy. Especially on the post-Blueprint, Kanye West-produced “Doin’ My Job.”

Give it a listen below, and take some time today to revisit T.I.’s work on Trap Muzik. Nearly two decades later, how well has the Atlanta rap veteran’s game-changing album aged?

Quotable Lyrics

And for you to see what I’m saying, open eyes will help
If you could think about somebody besides yourself
Why you pointing fingers at me, analyze yourself
Quit all that chastising and try to provide some help
Instead of calling the law and busting my balls
With all due respect, we don’t even be fucking with y’all

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